Frequently Asked Questions

While “censorship” is often used to refer to the suppression of public speech by government, the Internet as we know it is no longer a truly public space. Most online platforms through which we choose to express ourselves—and upon which many of us increasingly depend—are privately owned and operated. With these social media platforms replacing a truly open ‘public sphere,’ we need to be asking some serious questions about the role of companies in defining what is or is not ‘acceptable’ public speech.

We believe that OnlineCensorship.org can play an important role in holding Internet companies publicly accountable for the way in which they exercise power over people’s digital lives.

OnlineCensorship.org is a project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Visualizing Impact. Learn more about our team here.

We have a collection of useful articles and books on our resources page.

When we first launched the site in 2012, we focused on the biggest platforms at that time: Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Google+, and YouTube. We added Instagram for our relaunch in 2015. We are currently researching other major social media platforms around the world and will add more soon. If you have a suggestion, please contact us.

We will use the information submitted in several ways:

-To learn more about how social media companies enforce their terms of service.

-To understand how content takedown and account deactivation practices affect the lives and work of individuals in different parts of the world.

-To engage with companies on how they can improve their regulations and reporting mechanisms and processes.

-To raise public awareness about the ways that social media companies regulate speech and how users are affected.

We have a strong commitment to privacy. See our privacy policy.

If you can’t access the service at all, most likely that company is not trying to block you. Instead, the problem could be caused by one of any number of things. Perhaps the site is experiencing technical problems. Otherwise, it might be the result of filtering, which can come in many forms. A site may be filtered by whoever controls Internet access at your office, school, café or wherever you are currently using the Internet because they don’t want you accessing certain sites or content. Or perhaps your Internet service provider (ISP) is blocking the service. In some countries, government authorities block certain social media services or instruct ISPs to do so. All of these are forms of filtering.

If you would like to file a report about the fact that you cannot access a social media website from your location, please visit Herdict.org, which specializes in tracking Internet filtering around the world.

While we have focused on a limited number of popular platforms, this phenomenon is not limited to large companies. Similar issues are experienced by users of smaller, startup social media platforms as well. We hope that, by documenting censorship on major platforms, we will be able to inform the public as well as the entrepreneur community about the dangers of policing online speech.

Please contact us to share your suggestion.

Please contact us if you're interested in supporting our work.

Copyright and trademark-related takedowns are outside the scope of Onlinecensorship.org, but are covered under Lumen, a project that collects and studies legal complaints and requests for removal of online materials, including trademark, defamation, and privacy content removals.